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As the electoral counts rolled in, many minorities sat in disbelief as Donald J. Trump was determined to be the President–elect of the United States of America. However, after a year when so many unarmed, Black men were shot to death with zero repercussions or remorse—some didn’t find it so surprising.

Many bemoaned the idea of life under a Trump Administration given his incendiary rhetoric, which was given further fuel by the support of white nationalists and the “Alt-Right” –perceived by many to be Nazi’s. This perception was given credence due to them being seen giving Nazi salutes while yelling “ Hail Trump!” To be fair, Mr. Trump has said that he didn’t condone their actions. Yet, at a number of these events, the expulsion of minorities was cheered by attendees, who often attempted to intimidate protesters, with that sometimes resulting in physical assaults.

After hearing of a key nomination to Attorney General of Senator Jeff Sessions—who has a history negative racial comments—alarms were sounded for black Americans. Concern over setbacks under President-elect Trump continued to mount, over an administration that seemingly has zero consideration for this demographic. Many black Americans and minorities have espoused that this seems to be one of the key drivers for his election.

When considering these factors, it isn’t hard to understand why so many Black Americans and other minorities feel threatened by a Trump Administration.

The artist, Q-Tip of A Tribe Called Quest, thoughtfully reflected on Mr. Trump in a Bloomberg political television show after a well received and critically acclaimed single release entitled “We The People” –which recaptures the group’s 80’s positivity and consciousness while embodying the ethos most minorities felt upon hearing of the election results. The song questions our participation in his vision and the bleak expectations of what is likely to be in store for us. As Q-Tip stated in his interview “ I didn’t vote for Mr. Trump…but he is my President now..” an ethos echoed by Dave Chappelle on Saturday Night Live that was accompanied by an entreat on behalf of the historically disenfranchised along with a demand–directly to Donald J. Trump to include Black people along with other minorities in his vision for America. A chance Mr.Trump openly asked for during his campaign.

On that basis, I would urge Black America and other minorities to take a similar tract, think beyond their emotions and consider in a calculated fashion what opportunities lie ahead. I have given some thought in regards to specific targets for consideration.

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Source: Black Enterprise | Shawn Baldwin